Deactivated weapons

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    Tankermike
    Member

    Posts: 105
    Join date: 2010-02-11
    Age: 48
    Location: Edmonton

    Deactivated weapons

    Post by Tankermike on Mon May 28, 2012 12:40 pm

    Are there any members (Alberta) who are up to speed on the rules of owning a deactiaved weapon. I tried to do some research but only come up with limited information. I have read that you may require a letter from a gunsmith stating the weapon is deactivated and can not function as a firearm. What altercations are need other than than welding the action and the magazine, can any part of the firearm function like the trigger pull? But I want to be on the safe side, I dont want to buy a dewat and have it seized and go through the hassle. I understand that the chief firearms officer also can declare the weapon dewat, but again if I send it in and it fails it may get seized. What are the rules on replica frearms, rumor control has said any replica firearm can be seized but what about all those airsoft look a likes? Any information will be appreciated.

    Infanteer
    Member

    Posts: 668
    Join date: 2009-12-11

    Re: Deactivated weapons

    Post by Infanteer on Mon May 28, 2012 10:55 pm

    Holy crap... you are looking for a lot of info... LOL

    Do a google search for RCMP deactivation guidelines and you'll find all the details. I'm just not prepared right now to do that much typing. The gist of it is that a newly deactivated firearm can not cock and click. Everything needs to be welded tight and verified by a gunsmith. Firearms deactivated under the old guidelines that can cock and click are perfectly legal and there is no requirement to bring them up to the new standards.

    The rules on replicas can be a bit confusing and don't seem to make sense but that's only because they don't. It is legal to possess a replica that you owned before the change of the laws but it is illegal to sell or give away that replica. Deactivated firearms are real and therefore exempt from the replica laws. A replica is realistic copy of an actual firearm but can not and never will be able to function as a firearm nor cause harm... unless used as a club. The exception is a replica of an antique firearm as per the firearms act (firearms manufactured before 1898 that were not designed or re-designed to discharge rim-fire or centre-fire ammunition), which is legal. Again, if you go to the Canada Firearms Center website you will find all the details.

    Lastly comes airsoft. Originally considered replicas by Canada Border Services, the rules have slackened lately. Any airsoft that fires under 366 feet per second needs to have a clear or tinted receiver. An airsoft that fires over 366 feet per second can be a full metal replica and look just like the real thing. The principle behind this reasoning is that if the airsoft is capable of causing bodily harm it is no longer a replica, which is also why air guns (BB and pelets) can look like real firearms.

    Like I said, it can be confusing and is absolutely retarded. If a replica is perfectly harmless it is illegal, if it can cause harm it is legal.... go figure...

    I did a quick google search and found the following:

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    Tankermike
    Member

    Posts: 105
    Join date: 2010-02-11
    Age: 48
    Location: Edmonton

    Deactivated weapons

    Post by Tankermike on Thu May 31, 2012 11:19 am

    Thanks for the info, they don't make it very clear do they.

    Infanteer
    Member

    Posts: 668
    Join date: 2009-12-11

    Re: Deactivated weapons

    Post by Infanteer on Thu May 31, 2012 5:56 pm

    No, it's not clear and IMO these laws really don't accomplish anything.

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